Hundreds of Smartphone Apps Proven To Be Listening To + Watching Your Every Move

1/3/2018 by John F. O’Donnell

 

There’s a creepy company out there called Alphonso. They have software that can access the microphone of a user’s cellphone to listen in (Read: spy) on their surroundings to figure out what they’re watching and then sell that info to advertisers. A new report reveals that HUNDREDS of apps and games are monitoring smartphones via their microphones using this technology! And, in these instances, it’s all about targeting people with ads more effectively. The company claims that its technology does not record people’s conversations. It also says that it clearly explains what it does in the application’s private policies section. WHICH IS RARELY READ BECAUSE IT’S SO LONG AND FULL OF LEGALESE!

 

We here in the US live within the biggest surveillance apparatus in the history of the world. The 2013 revelations by Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA is watching our every move, a massive slap in the face of everything this country claims to stand for. And it’s not just the NSA. It’s the greater intelligence community. Last year it was revealed that the CIA has been exploiting security flaws in electronic devices, like phones, computers and even smart TVs, allowing them to listen in on our conversations without the target knowing it. We need to stop acting like living in a surveillance state is normal. This is far from normal. It should be noted that politicians in both of the corporate parties essentially NEVER discuss how we’re all being spied on by our own government. In the four 2016 presidential debates (3 presidential and one vice presidential), there were ZERO questions about privacy. If we want this to change, at the very least, we need to constantly talk about it!

For example, it’s crucial to note that when the Trump administration got a last minute temporary funding extension to keep the federal government operational back in December, the NSA’s expiring internet surveillance program, known as Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, was also extended through Jan. 19. And all signs indicate that this gross overreach, which is purposefully used to collect data on US citizens, will continue to exist when the more permanent budget spending bill is passed.

Keep Fighting!
John

 

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7 responses to “Hundreds of Smartphone Apps Proven To Be Listening To + Watching Your Every Move”

  1. Sally G says:

    I suspect that the apps change regularly—and not-so-regularly; one company was identified, so easy to block/trash anything by that company, and being aware of what can be hidden in terms of use is important. I generally skim terms and privacy policy when I sign up for something new; usually accept them anyway, but there have been a few that I decided were not needed.
    Most important, I think, we need to get Congress to #StopSection702, or at least do all we can to let them know that the public does not approve. I have been asking for a clean budget bill, NO policy riders (which are usually attached because they are too controversial to pass easily, or at all, otherwise). Time for Congress to do its job without pushing things off to the executive branch or bundling unrelated items so that it is hard to follow what is happening.

  2. dejavu says:

    Pocket Bowling 3D HD, Basketball 3D, Pool 3D, Dark Runner 2, Beer Pong: Trick Shot
    are a few of them.
    Search Alphonso in App Store or on Google Play.

  3. Christopher Bradley says:

    Yes, what are some examples of apps that are doing this? Why not name a few? I’d like to be sure I delete them.

  4. fisa_hatr says:

    You can read about the access you’re giving them before you download the app. If you don’t want to grant the access, don’t download it.

  5. Hunter Bauer says:

    Which apps are involved?

  6. Marco Martin says:

    What tom said

  7. Tom Walsh says:

    It would be great if you identified the listening apps.

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