MOC #235 – Pentagon Funding Memory Erasing Pills

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5 comments
  1. Thanks to the other commenters.

    Mine: We have memories and emotions for reasons….

  2. There is just no way this would not lead to some further horrific thing. I remember when GMOD plants were a new idea and it seemed like a great way to start living out those futurist science fiction scenarios. Live and learn.

    An alternative to forget-who-you-killed pills would be to make meditation part of military training… but it’s not convenient to prevailing ideas about religion.

    What a nightmare life on Earth apparently is, I’m glad that at least the worst parts of it only come to me through my monitor

  3. “Why is it easier to pioneer memory-erasing technology in the service of future atrocities, than to simply avoid the situations in which such violations of human rights occur?”

    Because there is no money in avoiding the atrocities of war.
    There is also a lot of money in pioneering and selling war technology

    Same thing with healthcare. Why don’t we throw away 90% of what is sold in supermarkets and teach people how to eat right and use herbs and holistic methods for dealing with their health?

    Beccause there are trillions of dollars involved in Big Pharma, invasive procedures and GMOs.

  4. @Iris: That is terrifying.

    Yes, it would be beneficial to use this technology to help desperate traumatized veterans.
    No, It would not be beneficial to use this technology to help normalize extreme violence during wartime.
    Unfortunately, there is no known way to spur military research that could directly undermine the military’s mandate to continually increase its budget or even exist at all. Blocking access to this memory-erasing technology to those on active military duty would serve as a hedge against increasing the number of atrocities during wartime, but even knowing that this treatment was waiting at the end could incentivize more brutality during deployment. All of this analysis is based on the assumption of future war. Why is it easier to pioneer memory-erasing technology in the service of future atrocities, than to simply avoid the situations in which such violations of human rights occur? The military can’t take all the blame. It is their duty to prepare themselves to the utmost. Whose job is it to prevent the need for the military to demonstrate their preparedness? Redirect focus there.

  5. I just started reading a book called “The Dark River, by John Twelve Hawks. According to the author it is “a work of fiction inspired by the real world.”

    In the Prelude, a chopper flew over a small progressive communty using a thermal imaging sensor that was capable of locating and counting all the people there. Then, the “head of security” instructed his waiting troops to take their PTS medication…. (pre traumatic stress pills) so they could overrun the cummunity and kill everyone there, including the children, without hesitation or unpleasant memories of it.

    Cute, yes?

    Hawks claims that all the things he disusses in his book are either real or under development and that soon both private and governmental total infomation systems will be monitoring every aspect of our lives.

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