Common Censored 16 – Our Bizarre Brain, The Fight for the Swamps & Assange

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11 responses to “Common Censored 16 – Our Bizarre Brain, The Fight for the Swamps & Assange”

  1. Patrick Dwyer says:

    Thanks. Info I had not had before. Keep fighting.

  2. Daniel Kohl says:

    Shane, really nice interview. There is a lot to be learned from from how people deal with, and turn adversity into something positive, and constructive.

  3. Lee Camp says:

    Very cool. Robin Williams was truly a magical talent.

  4. Shane Fistell says:

    Dear Mr. Camp,How are you?
    My dear,late friend, Dr. Oliver Sacks,wrote extensively about synaesthesia.I have Tourette’s Syndrome,and I have strong aspects of synaesthesia.I appear in an award-winning short (7 minute) documentary titled, Shane Fistell: A portrait of Tourette’s. Director Gloria Kim.
    I encourage you to watch.
    I was a dear friend of Robin Williams.I have two personal tapes of Robin that I would like to share with you one day. My only request is that they remain confidential and that they are not to be copied or released to the public at this time. Thank you, All the Best, Shane

  5. Stephen Ward says:

    So we can see how having a discussion about and against war but using terminology like ‘Advanced weaponry’ can make us think in a certain [positive] way about our weapons even if we’re not arguing on that side of the argument we mean or proportion to be on..

    But can we see how for example being against racism by the majority Collective of ethnicities who tend to have light pink beige skin – except we use the term White to refer to those ethnicities actually buying into white supremacist racism and furthermore by referring to discriminated ethnic minorities basically as blacks also has us maintaining the idea that there are white people and a separate race even though there are no white people and no separate races and we end up arguing on the opposite side we purport to be on..

    White reflects all colors whereas black absorbs all colors..- folks are not going to see the Sun as black or a black hole as white..
    Not to mention there are experiment where colors create moods..

    There’s a contrast between blue and green that would be perceptible to those who aren’t colorblind.. folks perceive reality differently but reality itself is not different or dependent upon one’s ability to perceive it..

    Is it really possible for a whole group of people to simultaneously View pink beige skin as white and claimed that is their reality because that’s what only they see and they see brown people as black but only when it’s skin? Wouldn’t artist only use white to paint portraits of Europeans and black to paint portraits of Africans and red for indigenous Etc? Yet Picasso didn’t use white only to depict the skin color texture of people he painted..

    One man’s mango is another man’s candy? Gravity doesn’t attract us to the Earth so much as it lifts us to the ceiling made of soil while we hang upside down?

    I think therefore I could be -depending upon the way I perceive it at the time- unless I’m on an American reservation for indigenous or in Camp 14 North Korea – then I am not?

    Wow – I said all that above with only 7 words

  6. Sara Griffin says:

    I read a VOX opinion article that suggests journalists ought to take a pledge to not print the results of a hacking. This would allegedly inhibit hacking and preserve our democracy. I think this is a ridiculous and extremely bad idea.
    It’s in response to the “RUSSIA!!!!” hysteria.
    My main problems are as follows. According to the article itself, “Information exposed in the hack provided fodder for countless news articles about internal Democratic Party discussions.” So for one thing, was this a hack or a leak? I am still skeptical that the Podesta emails released by Julian Assange were sourced from the Russians. I still believe it was an internal leak and not a hack, even if the Russians hacked into the DNC.
    True or false, all that aside, the information revealed that the DNC was cheating and throwing the primary, they were funneling donations into the Hillary Victory Fund away from states and down ticket campaigns, and they used their influence to focus media on Trump while ignoring Bernie Sanders. This volatile and important revelation shows that our democracy is being dismantled from within. Our awareness of this creates turmoil but the cause of the turmoil is not the leak or the hack or the publishing of the ensuing information, it’s the content. The unethical and possibly illegal behavior of the DNC is what threatens our democracy (and only one aspect of it at that, as you elaborate near the end of your podcast.)
    Why would real journalists want to keep us from knowing the truth?
    To punish Julian Assange is the definition of killing the messenger. With his health deteriorating, sadly this could become a literal interpretation and it’s wrong. His silencing is the expiration of the canary in the coalmine of our dirty politics. WAKE UP!

  7. Definitely describes my brain–bizarre. I believe a human being’s well-being is more important that corporations’ profits. Yeah, I’m “crazy” all right (Or is it the rest of the world?) Great show!

  8. Paul Blair says:

    Eleanor, I have often had the conversation as follows; How do I know that the red I see is the same red you see? Since from the time you started to talk, someone told you a color’s name and pointed to an example of said color. If what I saw was red and what you saw was my blue, we would both call it red because it’s what we were taught. People immediately bring up the science behind the color spectrum of what makes red, red and blue, blue, but that is actually irrelevant to the conversation. It’s a great discussion over a glass of nice whiskey or some other mind relaxing substance which lends itself to great ethereal discussion. I think that you and Lee get my point! Nice show! As usual, lots to think about.
    Also, the mosquitoes of Louisiana are without peer.

  9. Dolly West says:

    Thanks for mentioning synesthesia, in my case letters have colors, and yes, it is difficult if not impossible to describe them, because there is (probably) no such thing as a single color (blue, red, etc.). And it gets more complex when words are formed of multiple letters — which color becomes dominant, etc. Further, in my experience, my perception of these colors is unique to me — the one or two persons having the same syndrome whom I have happened to run into disagreed violently with my perception. I first discovered this through Rimbaud’s poem, “Voyelles,” with which I violently disagree… “Lee” is mostly liquid yellow, and “Camp” is a kind of soft diluted ochre (my general impressions of course), and yes, texture comes into the perception of color.

  10. AwGo says:

    Long live tha organazation to elect AwGo 😎

  11. What on Earth is Happening? You might want to interview Mark Passio.

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